vendredi 4 mai 2012

Chinoiseries I

The taste for designs and ornaments inspired by Chinese models started up in Europe in the XVIIth century, in England and the Netherlands first. These countries had indeed already established, at that time, strong and steady business relationships with the East.
It came to France a little later and really became a trend in the beginning of the XVIIIth century. This fashion gave birth to the most charming things, whether it be painted furnitures, fabric designs, paintings, tapestries and the like.
Chinoiserie designs were showing the everlasting seduction of exoticism but also expressed a real  admiration for chinese arts as well as for some aspects of chinese philosophy and society.

I created a "chinoiseries" collection for a Maison et Objet show a few years ago and ever since then I have orders for such designs. It is fun painting, full of charm and humor ; it is a nice playground for fantasy, nice color harmonies and strange vegetal forms...


Here is a version of a panel by A.Peyrotte. Casein on canvas ( approx. 210x100cm)

Pagode II


This another verison, the first I painted in fact, of the same design, on paper ( approx 180x75cm)

Pagode I


Here is now a series of paintings after the chinoiseries cartoons of F.Boucher.

Cipango I (150x85cm)



details on the face, before the aging proceses.



Cipango II (150x85cm)

Tian Shan ( 200x130cm)


The famous Giandomenico Tiepolo also painted a couple fo chinoiseries that I worked from in the following paintings









The next one is from a french ornemanist , Pillement.

Fleurs de chine ( 196x112cm)


and this very last panel is freely inspired and composed afer different designs of Pillement.


Rouge Orient ( 170x110cm)










16 commentaires:

  1. Your blue version is especially appealing, even better than the original I think. Love the little gold nugget at the base.

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  2. Thank you Scott. I am not sure but I think that the original painting by Alexis Peyrotte was like this. It belongs a set of four beautiful panels painted on gold leaf , very detailed . My versions are much more sketchy ...it is a stylistic choice and it also allows me to sell them at a reasonnable price .

    Pascal

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  3. Salut!
    J'ai adoré venir ici, votre blog est merveilleux, de belles images. Et je suis déjà à vous suivre, j'espère que tu sais mon espace et vous avez l'intérêt à suivre seront très reconnaissants.
    Cheers.
    http://wwwavivarcel.blogspot.com.br

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    1. Merci beaucoup, j'espère que tu auras plaisir a suivre mes futurs posts...

      Pascal

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  4. Votre travail est toujours aussi magique, au plaisir de vous revoir.
    Elise Valdorcia

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    1. Merci beaucoup Elise, je pourrais vous retourner le compliment et émettre le même souhait...

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  5. what a beautiful post full of delicious morsels! Like a plate of petits fours. I like the light touch you have with this whimsical style

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    1. a plate of petits fours, this is a noce description of what these paintings are...candies.

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  6. I remember seeing the blue one at Maison et Objet. It is still a favorite of mine! This is a lovely post Pascal.

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  7. Réponses
    1. Muchas gracias Azpeitia and welcome on this blog, I hope you will enjoy it.

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  8. Pascal, these are exquisite. I'm such a fan of Peyrotte's chinoiserie and your version is so delicately crafted. yum.

    Cleta

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  9. Thank you Cleta, I do appreciate the compliment of a connoisseur!!

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  10. I looove the rouge orient. And I love your work! Amazing!

    Mar

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    1. THank you very much Mar and welcome on this blog!

      Pascal

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